Now It's Gone

he’s on to us..

(Source: ravbrows, via nezua)

— 3 hours ago with 93714 notes
Part XVIII: Punishing Eve—Patriarchal Class-Based Society Brought to the Colonies through Violence and Genocidal Murder 

"Earlier chapters have discussed how the goddess-worshiping Neolithic civilizations located in the surrounds of the Mediterranean, and the Tigris and Euphrates river valleys, gave us all the high arts of civilization: agriculture and a managed food supply, architecture, art, forging of metals (but used for jewelry and artifacts not weaponry), language, script, literature, judicial systems, medicine, knowledge of anatomy, pharmacology, and astronomy. Archaeologists also tell us those societies worshipped a female goddess, were more matriarchal and matrilineal in structure and that their societies were the most just and humane in human history."

This series is very interesting.  Click on the image to read the whole passage.

Part XVIII: Punishing Eve—Patriarchal Class-Based Society Brought to the Colonies through Violence and Genocidal Murder

"Earlier chapters have discussed how the goddess-worshiping Neolithic civilizations located in the surrounds of the Mediterranean, and the Tigris and Euphrates river valleys, gave us all the high arts of civilization: agriculture and a managed food supply, architecture, art, forging of metals (but used for jewelry and artifacts not weaponry), language, script, literature, judicial systems, medicine, knowledge of anatomy, pharmacology, and astronomy. Archaeologists also tell us those societies worshipped a female goddess, were more matriarchal and matrilineal in structure and that their societies were the most just and humane in human history."

This series is very interesting. Click on the image to read the whole passage.

— 8 hours ago
#america  #genocide  #murder  #violence  #patriarchy  #society  #knowledge  #goddess 
sagansense:

Paleontologists Brought To Tears, Laughter By ‘Creation’ Museum

For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference.

But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution — and their life’s work — was attacked.

"It’s sort of a monument to scientific illiteracy, isn’t it?" said Jerry Lipps, professor of geology, paleontology and evolution at University of California, Berkeley.

"Like Sunday school with statues… this is a special brand of religion here. I don’t think even most mainstream Christians would believe in this interpretation of Earth’s history."



The 27 million dollar, 70,000-square-foot (6,500-square-metre) museum which has been dubbed a "creationist Disneyland" has attracted 715,000 visitors since it opened in mid-2007 with a vow to "bring the pages of the Bible to life."

Its presents a literal interpretation of the Bible and argues that believing otherwise leads to moral relativism and the destruction of social values.
Creationism is a theory not supported by most mainstream Christian churches.



Lisa Park of the University of Akron cried at one point as she walked a hallway full of flashing images of war, famine and natural disasters which the museum blames on belief in evolution.

"I think it’s very bad science and even worse theology — and the theology is far more offensive to me," said Park, a professor of paleontology who is an elder in the Presbyterian Church.

"I think there’s a lot of focus on fear, and I don’t think that’s a very Christian message… I find it a malicious manipulation of the public."

The museum argues that the fossil record has been misinterpreted and that Tyrannosaurus rex was a vegetarian before Adam and Eve bit into that sin-inducing apple.

Jardine, a palaeobiologist graduate student from the University of Birmingham, was having fun on the tour, but told a reporter that he was disturbed by the museum’s cartoonish portrayal of scientists and teachers.

"I feel very sorry for teachers when the children who come here start guessing if what they’re being taught is wrong," Jardine said.

Arnie Miller, a palentologist at the University of Cincinnati who was chairman of the convention, said he hoped the tour would introduce the scientists to “the lay of the land” and show them firsthand what’s being put forth in a place that has elicited vehement criticism from the scientific community.

"I think in some cases, people were surprised by the physical quality of the exhibits, but needless to say, they were unhappy with things that are inaccurately portrayed," he said.

"And there was a feeling of unhappiness, too, about the extent to which mainstream scientists and evolutionists are demonized — that if you don’t accept the Answers in Genesis vision of the history of Earth and life, you’re contributing to the ills of society and of the church."

Daryl Domning, professor of anatomy at Howard University, held his chin and shook his head at several points during the tour.

"This bothers me as a scientist and as a Christian, because it’s just as much a distortion and misrepresentation of Christianity as it is of science," he said.

"It’s not your old-time religion by any means."

Source: Phys.org; Photos via Vice article 'The Science of the Creation Museum'; Main image: Creation Museum CEO Ken Ham, who will be "debating" the CEO of the Planetary Society - Bill Nye "The Science Guy"

sagansense:

Paleontologists Brought To Tears, Laughter By ‘Creation’ Museum

For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference.

But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution — and their life’s work — was attacked.

image"It’s sort of a monument to scientific illiteracy, isn’t it?" said Jerry Lipps, professor of geology, paleontology and evolution at University of California, Berkeley.

"Like Sunday school with statues… this is a special brand of religion here. I don’t think even most mainstream Christians would believe in this interpretation of Earth’s history."

image

The 27 million dollar, 70,000-square-foot (6,500-square-metre) museum which has been dubbed a "creationist Disneyland" has attracted 715,000 visitors since it opened in mid-2007 with a vow to "bring the pages of the Bible to life."

Its presents a literal interpretation of the Bible and argues that believing otherwise leads to moral relativism and the destruction of social values.
Creationism is a theory not supported by most mainstream Christian churches.

image

Lisa Park of the University of Akron cried at one point as she walked a hallway full of flashing images of war, famine and natural disasters which the museum blames on belief in evolution.

"I think it’s very bad science and even worse theology — and the theology is far more offensive to me," said Park, a professor of paleontology who is an elder in the Presbyterian Church.

image"I think there’s a lot of focus on fear, and I don’t think that’s a very Christian message… I find it a malicious manipulation of the public."

The museum argues that the fossil record has been misinterpreted and that Tyrannosaurus rex was a vegetarian before Adam and Eve bit into that sin-inducing apple.

Jardine, a palaeobiologist graduate student from the University of Birmingham, was having fun on the tour, but told a reporter that he was disturbed by the museum’s cartoonish portrayal of scientists and teachers.

image"I feel very sorry for teachers when the children who come here start guessing if what they’re being taught is wrong," Jardine said.

Arnie Miller, a palentologist at the University of Cincinnati who was chairman of the convention, said he hoped the tour would introduce the scientists to “the lay of the land” and show them firsthand what’s being put forth in a place that has elicited vehement criticism from the scientific community.

"I think in some cases, people were surprised by the physical quality of the exhibits, but needless to say, they were unhappy with things that are inaccurately portrayed," he said.

image"And there was a feeling of unhappiness, too, about the extent to which mainstream scientists and evolutionists are demonized — that if you don’t accept the Answers in Genesis vision of the history of Earth and life, you’re contributing to the ills of society and of the church."

Daryl Domning, professor of anatomy at Howard University, held his chin and shook his head at several points during the tour.

"This bothers me as a scientist and as a Christian, because it’s just as much a distortion and misrepresentation of Christianity as it is of science," he said.

image"It’s not your old-time religion by any means."

Source: Phys.org; Photos via Vice article 'The Science of the Creation Museum'; Main image: Creation Museum CEO Ken Ham, who will be "debating" the CEO of the Planetary Society - Bill Nye "The Science Guy"

— 11 hours ago with 540 notes
Part XVII: Punishing Eve—Patriarchy Settles America with a Vengeance 

"The great poet and novelist, Margaret Atwood once wrote, in explaining the difference between her home country of Canada and the U.S., “Canadians and Americans may look alike,” she observed, “but the contents in their heads are quite different.” The difference is, in her view, the result of originating myths. The founding Puritans had wanted their society to be a theocratic utopia, a city upon a hill, to be a model and a shining example to all nations. The split between the dream and the reality is an old one, and it has not gone away. She writes that Canada suffers from no such split, since it was founded not by idealists but by people who’d been kicked out of other places.[1]
Atwood dedicated her novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” (of which we will discuss more in-depth later) to her ancestor on her maternal side, Mary Webster. Mary was accused and convicted of witchcraft in Hadley, Massachusetts in 1683 “for having provoked a righteous gentleman to become valetudinarious.” (Our ancestors used such great words—valetudinarious: a condition of being sickly or weak and especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health.) The esteemed cleric, Cotton Mather presiding over her conviction, commended it to his flock, that the execution was doing God’s work. Though Mary was hung on a tree and left to die she was found still alive the next day. Earning the name “half-hung Mary” she went on to live another fourteen years, but not in Massachusetts. The Websters packed up their Bibles and moved north to Nova Scotia where they would be free from fanatical and misogynist oppression and hatred.[2]”

This series is very interesting. Click on the image to read the whole passage.

Part XVII: Punishing Eve—Patriarchy Settles America with a Vengeance

"The great poet and novelist, Margaret Atwood once wrote, in explaining the difference between her home country of Canada and the U.S., “Canadians and Americans may look alike,” she observed, “but the contents in their heads are quite different.” The difference is, in her view, the result of originating myths. The founding Puritans had wanted their society to be a theocratic utopia, a city upon a hill, to be a model and a shining example to all nations. The split between the dream and the reality is an old one, and it has not gone away. She writes that Canada suffers from no such split, since it was founded not by idealists but by people who’d been kicked out of other places.[1]

Atwood dedicated her novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” (of which we will discuss more in-depth later) to her ancestor on her maternal side, Mary Webster. Mary was accused and convicted of witchcraft in Hadley, Massachusetts in 1683 “for having provoked a righteous gentleman to become valetudinarious.” (Our ancestors used such great words—valetudinarious: a condition of being sickly or weak and especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health.) The esteemed cleric, Cotton Mather presiding over her conviction, commended it to his flock, that the execution was doing God’s work. Though Mary was hung on a tree and left to die she was found still alive the next day. Earning the name “half-hung Mary” she went on to live another fourteen years, but not in Massachusetts. The Websters packed up their Bibles and moved north to Nova Scotia where they would be free from fanatical and misogynist oppression and hatred.[2]”

This series is very interesting. Click on the image to read the whole passage.

— 1 day ago
#america  #colony  #patriarchy  #women  #men  #heirarchy  #native  #cleansing  #mythology 
"You are allowed to be alive. You are allowed to be somebody different. You are allowed to not say goodbye to anybody or explain a single thing to anyone, ever."
Augusten Burroughs (via allegorys)

(Source: skylerhobbs, via nezua)

— 1 day ago with 162828 notes

owmeex:

Two Brothers Re-Create Childhood Photos As A Priceless Gift To Their Mother (via Then/Now)

(via surbeat)

— 1 day ago with 553449 notes
If you love someone, give that person a copy of your favorite book with an inscription. When you’re long gone, you can talk to them when they read that book. You could mean more to someone than you think. They may need to hear from you one day.

If you love someone, give that person a copy of your favorite book with an inscription. When you’re long gone, you can talk to them when they read that book. You could mean more to someone than you think. They may need to hear from you one day.

(Source: )

— 2 days ago with 1 note
pbstv:

Generating solar power could someday be as easy as flipping a switch. A molecular switch, that is.
Learn more from NOVA Next.

pbstv:

Generating solar power could someday be as easy as flipping a switch. A molecular switch, that is.

Learn more from NOVA Next.

— 2 days ago with 59 notes